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the two nations. we'll have the latest on his trip from dehli. >> and it's still london's fashion week, yes, strutting its stuff, but how luxury brands are faring. we talk to ceo angela aarons. we'll hear from her later in the show. >>> and taking the positive u.s. housing numbers from the nhab numbers. we'll be in new york with analysis at 11:45 cet. >> the italian election race is heating up. there is less than a week before voters head to the polls. comedian turns politician beppe grillo, in fact, is owes closing in on sylvia berlusconi for second place. official polls can no longer be published. the private polls seen by reuter s suggest mario monti may, in fact b with be something of a spoiler. >> and the election largely coming down to five key candidates. the front-runner is bersani. he's the leader of the center left pd party, calling for growth measures alongside monte's plan. sylvia berlusconi is threatening to make a political comeback despite corruption scandals. we've mentioned the comedian beppe grillo. at the same time, the former caretaker mario monti, he's been struggl
've seen -- what was it, the bruin london pack is deepening. so in some ways, it seems as though it's deepening. just a bit of news here following the discussion we had with stephane just a few minutes ago. the french finance ministry is now saying the state is not -- it's taking a stake in peugeot. it's not on the agenda. peugeot shares are down about 2% currently on the cac 40. it says an asset write-down doesn't mean it needs a capital boost, that the write-down doesn't affect its solvability or liquidity and that the probabilities pursue a recovery plan. all of this coming out of the french government is ironic in the first place. now you can see shares falling almost 275%, ross. clearly there is some hope that there would be a benefit here or help from the government without necessarily nationalizing, but they say their priority is to strengthen the gm alliance. we'll keep an eye on gm shares and see if they want to move it along. >> so no stake at the moment, according to french government. meanwhile, the world's fastest main, usain bolt could be ready to end his uk competitio
just received news that the bill has passed in parliament. let's go live to our correspondent in london, who is following the vote in parliament for us. what was the majority? >> it has really only just been passed -- 400 for the bill and 155 against it, which is quite a lot against it. most would have voted for the bill, but a large portion, really, of the conservative party have voted against it. >> ok, now, where is the political upset in all of this for the prime minister, for david cameron? some say that this vote could leave a legacy of bitterness within his own conservative party. >> well, yes, definitely. one british paper actually made an interesting comment and said the conservative party has had decades of being divided over europe and now david cameron has found an entirely new subject to split the party. humor aside, it has really been a struggle between traditionalists and modernizers. traditionalists have been quite vocal. one mp promoting the merciless prison of equality and another saying that he fears for the future of the children, but unlike the debate on europe, dav
contention. of course, in the london market, around about 18% of the london market cap is made up of russian companies because they're not sure about the quality of the investor base in russia to, obviously, have those listings. now, i spoke earlier to yevgenni , the head of the moscow inter bank exchange. it had its ipo just over an hour ago. it's trading just above the issue price of 55 rubles. and i spoke to the ceo about some of these key issues and about getting international investors excited about investing in an ipo here in russia or hong kong. let's listen in. >> the importance is for our business going forward because we come and speak with our clients and say, listen, you can do a sizable ipo on the exchange. we want to go out there and demonstrate it ourselves that we can go and raise half a billion dollars. it's a good saturday start. >> what has the international community been like? >> it has been predominantly good in judicial names. >> when i look at russian companies, i know that now roughly around about 18% of the listing market cap on the london market, for instance. why
the yen's decline. in fact, we're seeing quite a jump right now for the dollar. 0.6%, in fact, in london trading. right now at 92.95. the euro also gaining ground against the yen. we're seeing that at 125.90. now, earlier in the day the euro had slipped to the lower 124 yen level on investor worries about possible political shakeups in spain as well as italy. let's take a look at other urine yan stocks now. we're seeing trading is mostly higher at this hour despite concerns about the eurozone debt situation. the investors are hunting for bargains after the losses that were experienced on monday. we have the ftse 100 up by 0.5%. gains for the frankfurt market of just over 0.1%. and paris' cac 40 up 0.9%. the picture in asia today, almost a sea of red with the exception of shanghai there. japan's nicky snapping a five-day streak. they hope authorities will take steps to stimulate the economy. >>> looks like the yen's decline is proving to be quite a boone for toyota motor. the carmaker is predicting it will post its first operating profit in five years, thanks to the currency's weakness. t
a fourth day of hearings. nbc's jim maceda joins us from london. what can we expect today? >> reporter: good morning, mara. that's right, we may learn in the coming hour if oscar pistorius, that world famous double amputee sprinter will be freed on bail or not. i may because before that happens the prosecution and defense will be making their final argument, and based on the past three or four days that could take all day. not getting bail, mara, would clearly be a blow to pistorius. he and his coach want to get back on the track. they want to prepare mentally for this trial. but also because the momentum seems to be going so much in pistorius' favor especially after yesterday's bombshell when we learned that the lead investigator, the guy laying out the case against pistorius is himself facing seven charges in a case of murder dating back to 2009. now, the defense has already picked apart the investigator's facts to the point that he had to admit that pistorius' story is plausible that he shot and killed the girlfriend, reeva steenkamp by mistake, thinks her an intruder through the ba
. this mockup is based on the skull remained found in a dig 90 miles northwest of london. yesterday, archaeologists confirmed this skeleton is that indeed of the long lost king. famous from richard iii. talking to a woman behind the search in the next hour. fascinating stuff. >>> david letterman face to face with the butt of many of his jokes. he brought a tasty prop and a healthy dose of humor. >> i have made a few jokes, not just one or two, intermittent. but -- >> i didn't know this was going to be this long. >> now, wait a minute. maybe you can do that sort of thing in your state, buddy. >> i don't care if you're funny. from my perspective, the joke is funny, i laugh, even if it's about me. if it's not funny, i don't laugh. but i've never felt like it was anything that really bugged me all that much. >> now, what percentage of the jokes have you found funny? >> about 40%. roughly. >> can i just say, he's got good comic timing. >> great comic timing a great sport and smart to come on with the doughnut. you never know when you might get hungry, right? >> there you go. >>> in just
state from the finance ministers. we have a roundup of the g-20 meeting in moscow. >> and london fashion week is under way and international expansion seems to be the latest trend. we'll hear from top designers who are putting their foot forward on the global runway. >>> first, standard & poors says it wants more time to gauge shinzo abe's rating policies. s&p says recent policies could reflat japan's economy. but the government's books will continue to be weighed down by heavy debt. that's even if plans go ahead to raise a sales tax. there's a one in three chance of a downgrade this fiscal year. this is as the japanese prime minister shinzo abe says he will consider changing the bank's mandate. he didn't comment on current policy. all this as investors determine who will become the bank of japan's next governor. front runners for the post include former bank of japan deputy governor and the head of the asian development bank harikahiko tura. >> we did catch up with taro at a meeting this weekend in moscow. the next boj governor was covered, but the first question, whether mr. aso though
. and his speech in london was definitely a discontinuity point. i think he is what -- he impersonates the kind of leadership that we need in europe, someone that is, i would say, multicultural and that has a very clear perception of the global reality. while most of politicians in europe are purely domestic and, therefore, do not fully appreciate that we are competing in a global world. however, mario draghi sits in frankfurt and we need to implement reforms here and italians have to take charge of that, for that. and it's very interesting because you're referring to margaret thatcher in the uk and schroeder in germany. in continental europe, perhaps it is easier for center left coalitions to push forward with structural reforms because they can get the buyin of a larger segment of the population. >> do you think by doing what mario draghi has done he's actually given italy the stability no matter what happens at the election in order to pass through these reforms? he controls the market, in a sense? >> well, that is a very important form of insurance. the results are another one that
of loss like what we saw with the london whale. $6 billion is a lot. even at the beginning of it, when it first came to light, the -- jamie in this case characterize it had as a $2 billion loss and originally called it a teachest in a teapot. obviously there are -- there are different objectives that management and investors have. the board represents investors. those interests are not always aligned with management which is why, again, it should not be the same person overseeing the board that oversees the chief executive. >> i'm curious. do you feel that separating that position would have prevented a london whale? >> we think it would be clear alliance of accountability. it would have better aligned the investors' interests against the management interests, and quite possibly could have prevented the kind of situation or circumstances that led to that kind of role. >> did i hear you say that maybe in some cases when something like that happens the chief executive being held accountable should be let go? are you saying jamie dimon should have been fired for london whale? >> i didn't
around the corner from us here in london. thank you for coming by. >> pleasure. >> do you agree with what the white house is saying and what a lot of these ceos seem to be saying which is that the country is suffering a lack of competitiveness because of the lack of immigration policy? is this the next issue on the agenda? >> i think it's one of the issues. look at how they acted after 2008. i mean, the recession technically in the u.s. was smaller than it was in the eurozone. but the measures that were taken in the u.s. at that point in time in 2008 and 2009 were a lot more stringent than they were in the eurozone. if you look at the job cuts at that point in time, if you look at insolvencies, i think it's a lot more stringent than it happened here. but the flip side of the coin is the way it worked itself out of the recession i think is more impressive than what we're seeing here. wouldn't you say that has more to do with avoiding a sovereign debt crisis by virtue of not being a haphazard monetary union? >> that's part of it. but also, i think the way the u.s. manage itself out of the c
the business. the core of the bank remains the same. london investment bank and new york investment bank. the core of the bank remains the same. they're making changes around the area and the core of it is as it was. >> talk about the investment bank in particular. this has been the place where not just barclay's, but a lot of the competitors, too, try and wind things down. this is a place that's been pretty profitable in the last quarter. >> it is. and they're tied slightly with the investment bank. it's a big part of barclay's profit so he couldn't make big changes. he's announced radical cuts last year. that said, he has promised changes to bring costs down which would shift the balance slightly of shareholders. the cost income ratio was about 55% in 2012. he promised to bring that down to the mid 50s. >> just to stay on this point for a second, even ubs has quietly slowed, perhaps, what it was planning to do. it was the investment bank, in fact, that was one of the healthier parts of the business. >> absolutely. it's been a good end to last year for some parts of the investment bank.
to concerns over the bank's massive 2012 trading debacle. "in light of the london whale, the financial crisis of 2008, the libor crisis, the municipal bid rigging crisis, we think there is a problem with risk management at jpmorgan and we want an independent person running the board on behalf of shareholders." last month, dimon's compensation was cut in half. we reached jp morgan chase, but a spokesman declined comment. banks for a while have been criticized for not lending, but that's changing. commercial loans to business were up 16% in 2012. banks are benefitting from a lot of cash on hand. deposits have surged to $9 trillion, up 29% since 2008. in our cover story, it has been ten years since fire killed a hundred people and injured hundreds more at a rhode island night club, the tragedy made worse, many believe, because the building did not have automatic fire sprinklers. yet even after ten years of trying, the push for more sprinklers has been largely unsuccessful. it resumes next week in congress. when fire erupted at the station, a nightclub in west warwick, rhode island, rob feeney th
us from london. what can we expect today? >> reporter: hi. the judge who is overseeing this bail hearing said he'll make an announcement very soon, probably within 30 to 45 minutes if s osr put pistons, the sprinter known to the world as the blade runner will be free on bail or will he stay in jail until that trial which could take months. both sides, the prosecution and defense have rested their case after four days that have seen a real momentum shift in pistorius' favor especially after yesterday's bombshell when we learned that the lead investigator laying out the case actually against pistorius is himself facing seven charges of attempted murder. the defense had already at that point forced the investigator to back down on many points even admitting pistorius' story is plausible. in a state of panic he could have shot his girlfriend, killed his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp by mistake thinking her to be a dangerous intruder. the prosecution says that pistorius killed reeva steenkamp in cold blood, he has a history of violent behavior and freeing him on bail would give him a ch
at the tower of london. now, though, 500 years later, he gets a measure of revenge. finally he is the center of attention. for royal historians like sally dickinson smith, it's history come alive. >> it's a fascinating murder mystery. all of richard's life that we can still find archaeology like that and particularly under a municipal car park, i think that's fabulous. >> reporter: the king in the parking lot, history dug up and maybe rewritten. mark philips, cbs news, london. >> richard iii fell at the battle of bosworth ending the war of the ruses [ inaudible ] -- war of the roses [ inaudible ] >> you should have heard andrea and mike. >> i love this play. >>> we thank you for
this business in may in 2010 in london. we now work with over 500 homes there. i moved back to new york this past january to start one fine stay here. we add successful summer of trading. we work with 80 homes in new york. we are excited to grow in new york and beyond. >> evan is on the right side of your screen. he cannot react it criticism or compliments until i say so, which is how we like it. so, kate is founder of author of bold women big ideas. and leader of raising venture capital for female entrepreneurs at spring board enterprises. john snark carnie, cnn.com, editor and all right good guy. kay, your thoughts of evan's idea. >> i want to know how easy marketing led him to consumers and how he get customers. we didn't hear about that. >> i wonder about things like how are they insured. what kind of expenses do they incur from people just damaging homes, appliances, normal wear and tear. >> how competitive is the market where you will make enough profit margin to compensate for down time and things that john just talked about. >> there is one thing i like about it, he doesn't have
and soho earnings out of china. htc and mediatex report fourth quarter numbers. >>> back here in london, the jpmorgan trade known as the london well reportedly tried to warning others at the bank months before they led to losses of more than $6 billion. "the wall street journal" citing e-mails reviewed by a senate panel and jpmorgan and say bruno told another trader last january that the size of his bet wag getting scary. managers didn't stop his trades until march. the senate panel is examining whether the bank failed to disclose crucial information to its primary regulator. >>> and talking of wales, we have another discovery in the uk. slightly different nature, this, and it might leave one british man with a hundred thousand pound payday. 50-year-old ken willman stumbled upon a clump of whale vomit while walking his dog. he initially thought it was a football. but picked it up and noticed a foul smell. he then told sinus that a company offered to pay him 50,000 for the vomit which is used to make perfume. but companies in thailand offered up to 4 times that amount. i'm not sure how y
in london or certainly in the u.s. they wouldn't mind seeing at this point. >> we've created a million private sector jobs. >> in britain? >> yeah. >> well, congratulations. >> there you go. that is the great conundrum, right? >> it's true. the different between -- well, and even with germany. the liesh market social security holding up, despite the sharp contraction in the fourth quarter. although this will probably add to the sense that the german economy bottomed during that period. >> did i see any -- i haven't seen any, no. i think that's out a little later. plenty to get through on today's program. >> it's good to be back, by the way. >> biggest take away from the mobile world congress? what's the one thing you saw that you thought, oh, that is really cool. >> i go to a conference like this and i think, machine res taking over the world. >> that's the thing we talk about. i don't like those machine peps. >> exactly. so 50 billion connected-m devic. that's a figure thatjs -- some y the point is, it isn't just about you and i talking to each other on a mobile phone. we are well bey
that helped jpmorgan investigate the london whale trading fiasco. such vacancies could give the s.e.c. bare number of minimum commissioners to field a quorum on certain cases which could potentially weaken the commission. s.e.c. declined to comment to the newspaper on behalf of white who is not yet a commission official. back to you. >> thanks so much, eamon. reaction now with attorney andrew consultman who says this is a major problem, while a former s.e.c. official says the benefits of having the right people far outweigh the cost of some conflicts of interest. both join us right now for a discussion. good to have you on the program. robert, i think you make a good point. you want people with the experience and sort of know-how in some of these complicated cases to be working there, but how do you offset the potential for conflict of interest? >> well, that's right. here we have a clear case where there may be conflicts, but the s.e.c. has strong rules in place that prohibit voting on conflicts where the person directly worked on a case, but i think what's getting lost in this debate is t
a new store in central london at 10:45 cet. >>> the secretary of general of the international chamber of commerce in paris. a first on cnbc at clesk cet, 10:00 london time. >>> then a call on comcast shares after the now 100% owner of this company, they've announced they're buying the rest of nbcuniversal in a $16 billion deal. and i still want to say, i feel very comfortable about this. i feel very -- i'm sure you feel happy. good for everybody. >> they like us. >> g.e. stock was up -- >> i didn't like that g.e. stock was up, then i saw the reaction of comcast, all right, they're up, too. >> you, me, fantastic. we're very happy, brian. >> have to say that -- are you pained to say that i should say? >> i don't know. i'm paid, though. don't know if i'm paid to say that, but i am paid. right. have i done enough on that now? >> yes. >>> societe generale swung to a loss on the back of eurozone weakness and one of charges. coming in below expectations, the bank racked up a quarterly net loss of 476 million euros. on top of that, france's number-two listed bank had goodwill writedowns of $2
that much of the personnel was based in london. i actually didn't know at the time what the address of the partnership was. >> susie: lew said he received no tax benefit on that investment, and sold it at a loss. despite the tough questions, it is expected lew will win senate backing. >> susie: americans barely increased their spending last month, partly because of higher taxes, and energy prices. retail sales edged up just 0.1% in january. that's much less than in december. should investors be concerned about weak consumer spending? erika miller reports. >> reporter: consumer spending is watched closely, because it accounts for roughly 70% of economic growth. unfortunately, the latest reading on retail sales is not encouraging. the measley 0.1% gain in january was the smallest increase in three months. even core retail sales, which strips out volatile categories, ticked up just 0.2%. consumers have been cutting back on purchases of cars, clothing, and furniture. but sales did rise at home- improvement stores, gas stations and online retailers. part of the problem is rising prices a
in london. so you have a live trade in it at the moment. many people are puzzled as to why this stock has only lost now 4% of its value globally. and you have to understand how big carnival is, how well run and is well respected it is within the investment community. this is a huge stock. it has a 30 billion market cap, far bigger than most other stocks within the t&l sector. and on tuesday night when they warned and they did, they had an 8k warning, they said this could cost us 8 to 10 cents earnings per share. that's only 4% of their expected profitability for the entire year. most analysts on average have a buy recommendation. it's a gravy dividend play and, of course, they're so well insured. that's the other thing. if you look back at where we are this time last year, you know, when they have the tragedy off the coast of italy with the concordia, 32 people were actually killed. that isn't happening this time around. but then it was. and they came through and they said, look, we have a $30 million deductible on the ship, a $10 million deductible on the third party insurance and a mont
in london what his favorite ad was but, of course, he said broadcast cnbc, so they don't get to see the ads. can you imagine? >> no, even though i'm from san francisco. >> oh, look at that. >> right. >> still devastated by the outcome, then, i would imagine. >> a little bit. >> my sister is in baltimore. she's pretty happy this morning i would imagine, maybe hurting a little bit, too. >>> regulators are to be given the power so split up uk banks. this is one of the new laws to be outlined by the uk chancellor in a speech coming up shortly. again, we'll carry that speech live here on cnbc, 11:30 central european time, that's about 20 minutes time for those of you in the uk. and we will follow the entire speech plus the question and answer segment. so stay with us for that. meanwhile, there are more changes at the top over at barclay's tonight. chris lucas and general counsel mark harding both announced their retirement, saying it was the appropriate time. mr. lucas is one of four people being investigated over allegations the bank made loans to qatar bought into the company at the height of
. stephane, it might be snowing here in london later today, so maybe you can come up our way and enjoy it. >> thanks for that, stephane. >>> still to come on today's show -- >> sony gets a boost from the falling yen, but will the future remain bright? >>> the euro trades higher. the central bank not expected to move on rates. mario draghi also facing questions about the mo on nti paschi scandal. >> mark carney faces investors in the uk with the policy rate decision later today. >> alcatel lucent's ceo says he's bowing out of the group. he tells cnbc stepping down is for the best. >> i took the decision -- it's hard, you know? it is emotional. it feels like painful. but at the same time, it was better for the company and, therefore, that's what you have to do. >> and the falling yen helps keeps play station in the game. it swings to a third quarter operating profit. >> we have trade data out of the uk. december manufacturing output up 1.6% on the month, much stronger than the forecast plus 0.7. that meant the yen is down 1.7% on the year. december industrial production also up 1.17% on the
will prosecute. >> and it looks like markets are expecting the boj to buy on the london engine, but what about buying overseas? we've seen them indicate support for the esm or maybe looking at peripheral european sovereign debt which interestingly enough, europe is probably appreciative of the fact that someone is buying into the industry. but nevertheless, how aggressive might japan be about buying outside its shores in order to help weaken the yen? >> again, this is probably something that will get a clear picture after the -- will have his first meeting with the boj in march. i agree with you, there tends to be a more aggressive move towards european assets. having said so, i do not know if we will see drastic moves on interest rates overall. let's not forget on the debt side of the japan that most of the debt is in the hands of domestic investors that usually have less demand to increase interest rates for the environment suggest so. >> okay. marco -- >> so at the end of the day, i don't see increase of interest expense drastic for japan in the medium term. >> right, right. well, that's th
. >> great to see you. >> i love london and it's great to be with you. >> thanks. we could be a luxury business. greg furman, are we a luxury business? >> i think you are. information is critical. >> okay. great. i like that. thank you. greg furman. >>> now, roaming charges may be a scary phrase to frequent travelers, but it's the key revenue stream that's in danger of going way for mobile providers. kelly will be speaking from the mobile world congress. she's still in barcelona. day two of that. more to come on "worldwide exchange." [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ there. i said it. they don't have pictures of my kids. they don't have my yoga mat. and still, i feel at home. could it be the flat screen tv? the not so mini fridge? ♪ the different free dinner almost every we
are suspected. we'll have more from london later on "cbs this morning." >>> the "washington post" says washington has been rated the worst for gridlock. the average driver there burns 67 hours and 32 gallons of gas each year sitting in traffic. >>> and the "wall street journal" reports dollar stores are feeling the pinch. sales have slowed in part because of rapid growth. dollar general plans to open 635 new stores this year. family dollar stores will open about 500 new st >>> millions of dollars were spent on the superdome's electrical system before the super bowl. and the lights still went out. >> all we know is we have an interruption in service that occurred. >> we'll show you how officials knew about a blackout threat for months. >>> and the government is fighting a giant beer merger. we'll show what a merger of budweiser and corona could mean for beer lovers all over america on "cbs this morning." i'm lorenzo. i work for 47 different companies. well, technically i work for one. that company, the united states postal service®, works for thousands of home businesses. because at us
of lawsuits by those who say it violates their religious freedom. fox news chief london correspondent james rosenbaum with the changes and why some critics say they don't go nearly far enough. >> under the new rules proposed by health and human services secretary, a nonprofit religious employers will be able to opt out of the obamacare mandate for the provision of the mill contraceptives through their health care plan. instead, the insurers will be required to provide coverage, which include standard birth control and items like the morning after pill. the white house said the modifications the president obama's overarching goals. >> we had to ensure that women have access to preventive services like contraception and that the policy also respects religious beliefs. >> the catholic league hailed the announcement as a sign of goodwill to the catholic community, but because private sector firms with religious objections are not covered by the new proposals and because many insurance firms are apt to shift the of a sharp teeseven absorbed costs back to employers anyway, even if they are not fo
news. >>> vice-president joseph biden is in london to meet with joe cameron and the deputy prime minister. there is some video of vice- president joseph biden arriving at 10 downing street. the tour is also including france and germany. >>> the ban on gay marriage moves to britain. the parliament is expected to pass a law for same sex marriage despite some tough opposition. many support the church of england's view that marriage should only be between a man and woman and supporters say it is wrong to he can clout colluded somebody -- exclude somebody from marriage simply because they love somebody of the same sex. >>> it happened shortly after 11:00 a.m. no arrests have been made but witnesses reportedly saw several people running from the scene. the victim later died at the hospital and police are withholding his name until all family members can be notified. >>> a plan to redevelop san francisco's market street may well affect mission street as well. they are planning on banning buses on mission street and moving them to market street as well. moving buses from mission to marke
in london and new york. she couldn't have been nicer, kinder, and we had a great time and it was a great party and we enjoyed it. it's like seeing babe ruth at one time. >> you didn't hit on her, did you? >> i certainly did not. >> who made better taco dip, me or porter. >> don't put me in that bind. >> was there velvetta in it? that's it for us, we'll see you back here tomorrow before bob embarrasses someone else. >> bleed a little now or a lot later. the president you do congress to come up with a short term plan to avoid devastating defense sequester cuts. this is special report. >>> good evening, i'm john roberts in for bret baier. the white house dreamed of a specker of spending cuts to reach a budget deal. it was supposed to be a bluff but today president obama called his own bluff pleading with congress to kick the sequester deadline down the road. to win them over he offered a package of spending cuts and more tax increases. how was that playing on capitol hill? here's ed henry. >> warning the nation's economic recovery hangs in the balance, president obama prodded congress to st
and in 2012 in london. and another top athlete looking something less than graceful. cbs sports caught this shot of phil mickelson taking a spill while retrieving a ball at the at&t pebble beach pro-am. i know exactly how you feel. >>> a new week starts tomorrow on wall street. but can the dow maintain its winning streak? [ laughs ] now this is a test drive. whoa! you really feel all 335 foot-pounds of torque. it's chevy truck month! silverado was also recognized for the lowest cost of ownership. hey, what are you gonna do with it? end table. oh. [ male announcer ] it's chevy truck month. now get 0% financing for 60 months, plus trade up to get $1,750 total allowance on a silverado all-star edition. or trade up and choose customer cash plus option package discount for a total value of $7,250. ♪ many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. >>> this just in to "cnn newsroom." police are questioning two persons of interest in the slaying of 15-year-old adia pendleton a day a
it. for her you can see it. she is about 4 1/2 months pregnant. she stopped by a london group that helps women overcome substance abuse. her health has improved since she was treated for severe morning sickness at the ginning of her pregnancy. the child will be third in line to the british throne. >>> first lady michelle obama says a mid-life crisis led to those new bangs. yes, ladies, even the first lady jokes that she's going through a mid-life crisis. in an interview with rachael ray, the first lady says she can't get a sports car and she wouldn't be allowed to bungee jump, so she decided to get bangs. mrs. obama showed off her new do last month on her 49th birthday, just before president obama's second inauguration. >>> and we're going to check now on the stories that we're going to be following for you later today. pat lawson moususe joins us wit preview. >> coming up at 4:00, how the budget cuts facing congress could impact your grocery bill. why no deal from lawmakers may meet shorter and higher prices. >>> plus, do you remember this classic commercial? >> pardon me, do
don and atta boy because at the point of the london whale at jpmorgan, you bought in. what, what was the price? >> $0 a -- $30 a share. liz: and today, they are considerably higher. how did you know? how did you not worry about what was happening at that point? >> we believed that the stock was already pricing in all of the bad news, and the upside was being -- you know, the tell on that -- liz: $18 higher today than when you bought it. >> yep. the tell was that it started to show improvement in earnings and revenue growth. that's what we always are looking for. those trends turns positive, the stock follows, price follows, and positive price momentum and confirmation on the fundamental's side, we're a buyer. liz: hits a 52-week high, perfect timing for don. we call it out when you do well. listen to don. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. liz: see you next time, wbi fund ceo and co-portfolio manager. seven minutes before the closing bell rings. about six and a half. did you see this? the asteroid coming within 17,000 miles of us? in the last hour or so -- look at that thing
those hundred million people want to get to know why, london, paris, rome, orlando, and las vegas, so there is a big problem. the other problem is in the new model at $100 a barrel while there is no into middle seat. as would typically be given away with rewards. those will be available the folks as well. gerri: we have to find some bright side. it's a tough story. thank you for coming on. great to see you. >> there will have some new aircraft and other things, so there are few bright sides. gerri: maybe it will serve hot food. your nose. picture coming out. >> thank you. gerri: be sure to tune in tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern. joined by the ceos of of to these companies. another big deal making is on wall street. warren buffett is buying catch up, all of it. his berkshire hathaway is teaming up with the brazilian backed investment firm to buy h.j. heinz demean of the company. the price tag of 28 billion come including debt. a 20% premium on the company's value the day before. his second biggest deal ever. earlier here he spoke to of liz claman on why he chosen a private equity partner
companies, a spocks, the banking arm of lloyd's the lloyd's of london insurance, bank essentially. while bank of scotland and commerzbank. pretty interesting. it's not like to salute your there. a lot of hedge fund managers trade because they want to cover their tracks. he put out a bid, and there are banks that picked up,. he is doing this just as he is talking about financials. why are we telling you this? well, maybe put it into your investment mindset, you know, a guy that likes financials may be turning a little bearish. why? you heard dick did something the other day. liz: 14 years. >> never gone down in value or had a bad quarter. he did not quite say that, but very bullish. financials could have headwinds. european problem starting to creep back. morgan stanley put out a note that said be wary of the european economies. the ability of certain countries to pay back debt. spain obviously a big -- one of the worries and parties, and, by the way, if you're worried about the country's you have to worry about the banks. even here, the bank sold some of that talks to stop. -- the banks
, they made a single bet that blew up so big, they lost $6 billion. on this london whale trade. so these institutions are going out and being reckless again. they're going out and playing that they know the government will be there to back them up. david: david, one final point. anytime you hear somebody say tarp paid off its bets and aig is a perfect example, the way they, the way they did creative accounting with tax writeoffs, you write about this, aig in 2011 made $20 billion. what they don't say that 17.7 billion of money booked in as a profit was a tax writeoff from the financial crisis, right. >> that's right. all these institutions basically operated for years tax-free simply because they were able to book all the losses that they had, that they suffered as a result of making stupid decisions and stupid bets. they were able to write that off on their taxes. that is the double wham any -- whammy of this tarp program. you shore up companies. you lose money on the program. then the other side they book the losses as writeoffs and get you on the other side. david: david weidner
on equity of more than 16%. number two, j.p. morgan, even what the london scandal from last year, this bank's finances are in solid shape according to 247, even though they disagree with the report i decided. a profit of more than 21 billion in 2012, and the number one city to bankamerica, wells fargo. the reason it is so safe, this bank makes its money acting more like a bank and a brokerage investment firm and gets a lot of kudos from analysts. also on the last. coming up, the first lick "consumer reports" top five cars for 2013 and next, is 72 the new 30? the details of the new scientific report and a look at what it means for your retired plant. coming up. ♪ ♪ gerri: talk about for everyone, new scientific study saying people are living longer than ever before and that at 72, the new 30. with more on this, the fox news medical a-team every let's start there, talk about the study. at that this was amazing. what do you make of it? >> i love it. and the reality here is that the chances of your dying now at the age of 72 is the same as our chances 200 years ago and dahlia the age of 30.
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